stories 1a

What’s your story?
It’s all in the telling. Stories are compasses and architecture; we navigate by them, we build our sanctuaries and our prison out of them, and to be without a story is to be lost in the vastness of a world that spreads in all directions like arctic tundra or sea ice. To love someone is to put yourself in their place, we say, which is to put yourself in their story, or figure out how to tell yourself their story.

Which means that a place is a story, and stories are geography, and empathy is first of all an act of imagination, a storyteller’s art, and then a way of traveling from here to there. What is it like to be the old man silenced by a stroke, the young man facing the executioner, the woman walking across the border, the child on the roller coaster, the person you’ve only read about, or the one next to you in bed?

We tell ourselves stories in order to live, or to justify taking lives, even our own, by violence or by numbness and the failure to live; tell ourselves stories that save us and stories that are the quicksand in which we thrash and the well in which we drown, stories of justification, of accursedness, of luck and star-crossed love, or versions clad in the cynicism that is at times a very elegant garment. Sometimes the story collapses, and it demands that we recognize we’ve been lost, or terrible, or ridiculous, or just stuck; sometimes change arrives like an ambulance or a supply drop. Not a few stories are sinking ships, and many of us go down with these ships even when the lifeboats are bobbing all around us.

Rebecca Solnit, ‘The Faraway Nearby’.

Those were the opening lines of this book that had got me in hook, line, and sinker.

“In this exquisitely written book, Rebecca Solnit explores the ways we make our lives out of stories, and how we are connected by empathy, by narrative, by imagination. In the course of unpacking some of her own stories—of her mother and her decline from memory loss, of a trip to Iceland, of an illness — Solnit revisits fairytales and entertains other stories: about arctic explorers, Che Guevara among the leper colonies, and Mary Shelley’s Dr. Frankenstein, about warmth and coldness, pain and kindness, decay and transformation, making art and making self. Woven together, these stories create a map which charts the boundaries and territories of storytelling, reframing who each of us is and how we might tell our story.”

I think it has just succeeded in making that improbable leap to land itself right on top of all my stacks of TBR (both physical and digital).  And that’s no small feat. Am so very thrilled to have stumbled upon the sole copy of this book at the Big Bad Box Sale over the weekend.

(Yes, there have been subsequent trips to the box sale, and yes, you will get to see them soon!) 😉

 


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3 thoughts on “What’s Your Story?

  1. I can understand why this jumped to the top of yiur pile. The quotes about why we tell ourselves stories gives a lot of food for thought. Telling stories to justify a murder is a startling comment.

    Like

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