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Behold, the latest batch of beauties to have been added into the fold…..

Although it appears that I have been unrepentant over my reckless book buying habits, and that the staggering figures as revealed from my earlier post on taking stock of my entire library seem to have had no apparent effect on me, I can safely vouch that this is not true (well, not entirely anyway).

While it is true that I will not be able to stop buying books in the foreseeable future (and I don’t intend to, either), it is however, going to be a much more subdued/ restrained affair from now on (so she says…). At any rate, that is the plan. Along with the other plans to read more from my own stacks and to get rid of  give away the ones I no longer need/want in my collection. In other words, to be a better curator of my library.

Will just have to see well how things go according to plan, I guess.

And now, onto the books……

These were gotten from another recent book sale that could well give the Big Bad Wolf a run for its money, I would say. Brand new and priced at RM 5 (around USD 1.20) each, it’s easy to see why they were so hard to resist, isn’t it? :p

I recall reading some good stuff about Sun-Mi Hwang’s The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly some time ago, but even if I had known nothing about the book, the sheer beauty of the cover and illustrations in it would have sold it to me. Nina Sankovitch’s Signed, Sealed, Delivered: Celebrating The Joys of Letter Writing was a no-brainer for me, seeing that it’s all about a favourite subject of mine. Dianne Hales’ Mona Lisa: A Life Discovered happens to be a new discovery for me, as I wasn’t aware of the fact that Mona Lisa was a real person and not just a painting! :p

The Paris Review Book: of Heartbreak, Madness, Sex, Love, Betrayal, Outsiders, Intoxication, War, Whimsy, Horrors, God, Death, Dinner, Baseball, … and Everything Else in the World Since 1953 should be an interesting one to dip into….  “This astoundingly diverse anthology, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Paris Review, is jam-packed with resonant and provocative work from some of our greatest writers, past and present: W.H. Auden, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Jack Kerouac, Elizabeth Bishop, Truman Capote, William Burroughs, Susan Sontag, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison, Jonathan Franzen, Ian McEwan and Alice Munro, to name just a fraction.”

A Buzz in the Meadow: The Natural History of a French Farm by Dave Goulson, is yet another one that had me sold on its cover alone. Fortunately, what is offered between the covers seems to be just as promising. “Goulson has that rare ability to persuade you to go out into your garden or local park and observe the natural world. The subtle glory that is life in all its forms is there to be discovered. And if we learn to value what we have, perhaps we will find a way to keep it.”

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The Affairs of Others: A Novel by Amy Grace Loyd was picked because I recalled having read something about the book sometime back that had piqued my curiosity then. I thought it was worth a try for the price….

Matthew Dennison’s Behind the Mask: The Life of Vita Sackville-West is said to be “…. the first biography to be written of Vita in thirty years that reveals the whole story and gets behind ‘the beautiful mask’ of Vita’s public achievements to reveal an often troubled persona which heroically resisted compromise on every level.”

An Everlasting Meal: Cooking with Economy and Grace by Tamar Adler is a meditation on cooking and eating that weaves philosophy and instruction into approachable lessons on feeding ourselves well. I am no cook, let’s get that clear first. But I enjoy reading essays on cooking, just like how I enjoy essays on gardening even though I do not garden (other than the occasional watering of my mum’s plants). Like armchair travelling, these are my versions of ‘armchair cooking’ and ‘armchair gardening’, minus the sweat and dirt, I guess. 🙂

Sinclair McKay’s Ramble On: The Story of our love for walking Britain seems to fit the bill nicely for some mild armchair travelling.

Michelangelo: A Life in Six Masterpieces by Miles J. Unger, attempts to portray the artist’s life through the story of six of his masterpieces. Sounds like a fascinating read to me. Am looking forward to it.

Judith Flanders’ The Making of Home: The 500-Year Story of How Our Houses Became Our Homes is one that has been on my radar for some time. I have always found the subject matters in her previous books appealing (The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime; Consuming Passions – Leisure and Pleasures in Victorian Britain;  The Victorian House: Domestic Life from Childbirth to Deathbed), so I was quite thrilled to find this at the sales (did I mention it has a lovely cover too?).  

And being the Francophile that I am, I was especially happy to be able to add David Downie’s A Passion for Paris: Romanticism and Romance in the City of Lightinto the basket as well.

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Rachel Allen’s Coast: Recipes from Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way is a feast for the eyes (and probably stomach, for those who intend to put the recipes to good use) with beautiful shots of the rugged Atlantic coast of Ireland.

Food Heroes: Sixteen Culinary Artisans Preserving Tradition by Georgia Pellegrini looks to be a promising read as well. Filled with colorful anecdotes, photographs, and recipes, this book offers an accessible introduction to the artisanal food movement, and vicarious living for armchair travelers, food lovers, and others who might won­der what it would be like to drop everything and start an olive farm, or who yearn to make and sell their own clotted cream butter. No harm dreaming, eh? 🙂

The Italians: A Full Length Portrait featuring Their Manners & Morals by Luigi Barzini, examines “the two Italies”: the one that created and nurtured such luminaries as Dante Alighieri, St. Thomas of Aquino, and Leonardo da Vinci; the other, feeble and prone to catastrophe, backward in political action if not in thought, “invaded, ravaged, sacked, and humiliated in every century.

Elergy for Iris by John Bayley, poignantly describes the love affair between the writer and Iris Murdoch (his wife of forty two years) and the dimming of her brilliance due to Alzheimer’s disease. I have yet to read anything by Murdoch although she has long been on my list of to-read. Maybe this will help to move things up abit.

Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction: Work from 1970 to the Present edited by Lex Williford & Michael Martone. This anthology is said to consist of the most highly regarded nonfiction works published since 1970 by fifty contemporary writers including Cheryl Strayed, David Sedaris, Barbara Kingsolver, Annie Dillard, Amy Tan &David Forster Wallace with pieces ranging from memoir to journalism, personal essays to cultural criticism.

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I discovered Lucy Knisley’s graphic novels in this same book sales last year, when I found a copy of her book Relish: My Life in the Kitchen, and have since been on the lookout for more of her works. So to find a copy of her illustrated travel journal French Milk this time round, was rather blissful.

Ken Jennings’ Maphead: Charting the Wide, Weird World of Geography Wonks “…… takes readers on a world tour of geogeeks from the London Map Fair to the bowels of the Library of Congress, from the prepubescent geniuses at the National Geographic Bee to the computer programmers at Google Earth. Each chapter delves into a different aspect of map culture: highpointing, geocaching, road atlas rallying, even the “unreal estate” charted on the maps of fiction and fantasy. Jennings also considers the ways in which cartography has shaped our history, suggesting that the impulse to make and read maps is as relevant today as it has ever been.” 
I am definitely no maphead, but this has somewhat piqued my interest.

Next comes the four books which I had ordered over the internet some time back and had them sent over to my friend’s place in the UK because I knew she would be making a trip back home this month, and that means I can save on shipping. :p

I am only now reaching the tail end of Azar Nafisi’s Reading Lolita in Tehran (after having started on it some months back) but I had already decided early on that I wanted to read more of her books because I really like her writing. And I have to admit that I would not even have attempted Reading Lolita in Tehran if not for a dear friend’s high regards for it. I think I was put off by Lolita, a book that has never appealed to me before. I am glad to report though, that Nafisi’s book is so much more than what I had imagined it to be. I enjoyed the book very much and look forward to her Things I’ve Been Silent About: Memories of a Prodigal Daughter next.

Writing the Garden: A Literary Conversation across Two Centuries by Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, may be yet another collection of garden writing, however, “….. it is not simply a collection of extracts, but real discussions and examinations of the personalities who made their mark on how we design, how we plant, and how we think about what is for many one of life’s lasting pleasures. Starting with “Women in the Garden” (Jane Loudon, Frances Garnet Wolseley, and Gertrude Jekyll) and concluding with “Philosophers in the Garden” (Henry David Thoreau, Michael Pollan, and Allen Lacy), this is a book that encompasses the full sweep of the best garden writing in the English language.”

Sea Room: An Island Life in the Hebrides by Adam Nicolson (grandson of Vita Sackville-West) is the account of Nicolson’s love affair with the three tiny islands he had inherited for his 21st birthday (how cool is that!) and describes “…. their strange and colorful history in passionate, keenly precise prose—sharing with us the greatest gift an island bestows on its inhabitants: a deep engagement with the natural world.” Again, it was the cover that got my attention first, one day while I was browsing around the internet. Sadly, I could not locate an affordable copy of the edition that had my desired cover, and had to settle for another. I am thinking though, if I end up loving the book, I might yet continue to pursue the aforementioned elusive expensive cover. :p

Lastly, Richard Mabey’s A Nature Journal.

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I probably don’t need to tell you why I had to have it, right? :p

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10 thoughts on “Unrepentant

  1. Woohoo! A great bunch of new books, plenty of interesting titles. Some of them are on my list as well.
    It’s shallow but – the covers are all so beautiful!!
    Which one are you reading first?

    Like

    1. I am going to read The Hen Who Dreamed She Could Fly first, because I am planning to ‘help’ make her dream come true by sending her ‘flying’ over to you in the guise of an early Christmas present….. that is if you don’t mind having a gently read, second hand book for a gift? :p

      Liked by 1 person

        1. A through and through book lover to the core! 😀
          I’m glad the idea appeals to you, too. I’ve just finished the book last night….. so now, we just need to pick a suitable travelling companion for it (it’s a long haul flight, after all!), and she’s all set for take off. 🙂

          Like

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